What is the real problem?

source: pcmag

I am the new owner of a Fitbit One. For those of you who don’t have experience with Fitbit, Jawbone UP, or Nike Fuel Band, these devices track your activity. They measure how many steps you’ve taken, calories burned and even how well you sleep.

Peter Drucker tells us that “what gets measured gets managed.”

The makers of activity tracking devices have a hypothesis. If you are continually measuring your activity against set goals, over time you have a better chance of living a healthier. more active live then those that don’t us the device.

What would this look like in the context of your life? What would it be like if every activity your performed was tracked? Would it give you a better shot at achieving your goals?

More importantly, does technology solve all our problems? I will admit, I am terrible at tracking my activity. I even made the book below to try and stay on top of what I was doing at work.

photo

But is technology really the root cause to this problem? Many individuals in the last several hundred years have managed to log their activity.

Will technology make activity tracking easier? Of course it will. But keep asking “what is really the problem?”

In The Toyota Way to Lean Leadership, Jeffrey Liker tells a story about a problem that was occurring in the body shop at a Toyota plant. The workers on the line where over tightening the bolts and it was causing small dents in the body.

A new Toyota executive, Gary, had the perfect solution to the problem – buy wrenches that shut off at the proper torque. i.e. upgrade the technology. GM, Ford and others all had these wrenches. Why didn’t Toyota? This answer did not suffice for Toyota management – they sent Gary back into the plant to observe some more and come up with another answer.

Through root cause analysis (see The 5 Whys), Gary was able to determine that the real problems were tool maintenance and training. He instituted a new program that helped to keep the shop tools well maintained. Rather than spending millions of dollars on new drills, his solution was cheap and solved the real problem.

Without question, root cause analysis is hard. Your boss will want “the story” quickly and many companies have short term goals, so quick fixes are preferred to solving the real problem. Think of the patience and wisdom Toyota had by sending Gary back to the plant for another week to try again. How many managers would have been delighted that his or her employee had come up with a solution?

Next time you discover a problem and think you have a solution, think about root causes. You may be solving the wrong problem.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “What is the real problem?

  1. Seems like the best solution would have been what Toyota did, plus torque wrenches.

    I’ve been using a Fitbit since July 22, and so have many of my coworkers. In that time I’ve averaged just under 15,000 steps per day. Having a device that’s “watching” my activity is some amount of motivation to be more active, and of course the competition that arises naturally is even more motivating. For many people, the root cause of being sedentary is having a job working at a computer for 8 hours per day (plus commuting), and to some extent that isn’t going to change for most people, so any extra reason to be active during our leisure time is probably a good thing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s